Spaces of the Internet. SAN FRANCISCO
fastcompany:

[Image: Courtesy Akamai]
From satellite modems to temporary packet radio or Wi-Fi networks to secret “communication kits,” here’s how Syrians might communicate with the outside word amid an Internet shutdown.

fastcompany:

[Image: Courtesy Akamai]

From satellite modems to temporary packet radio or Wi-Fi networks to secret “communication kits,” here’s how Syrians might communicate with the outside word amid an Internet shutdown.

The country of Syria was completely disconnected from the internet. This was one of the last videos uploaded to youtube. (warning very graphic)

Steven Colbert reports on High-Frequency Trading  


The Atlantic Cities:
Communities Aren’t Just Places, They’re Social Networks.
Richard Florida. Oct 25, 2012.
Cities are obviously more than just the sum of their physical assets — roads and bridges, offices, factories, shopping centers, and homes — working more like living organisms than jumbles of concrete. Their inner workings even transcend their ability to cluster and concentrate people and economic activity. As sociologist Zachary Neal of Michigan State University argues in his new book, The Connected City, cities are made up of human social networks. Neal took time to discuss his book and research with Atlantic Cities, explaining how cities work as living organisms and why what happens in Las Vegas cannot stay in Las Vegas.
RF: In the book, you write that “communities are networks, not places.” Tell us about why and how networks matter to cities?

ZN: We often think of communities in place–based terms, like Jane Jacobs’ beloved Greenwich Village. But, whether or not a place like Greenwich Village is really a community has more to do with the residents’ relationships with one another — their social networks – than with where they happen to live or work. The danger of thinking about communities as places is that it can lead us to find communities where they don’t exist.  A neighborhood where the residents never interact is merely a place, but hardly a community. This can lead us to overlook communities that are not rooted in particular places, like a book club with a constantly changing venue.
Communities aren’t disappearing, but to find them we need to stop looking in places, and start looking in social networks.”
Image: easyshutter /Shutterstock
via massurban

The Atlantic Cities:

Communities Aren’t Just Places, They’re Social Networks.

Richard Florida. Oct 25, 2012.

Cities are obviously more than just the sum of their physical assets — roads and bridges, offices, factories, shopping centers, and homes — working more like living organisms than jumbles of concrete. Their inner workings even transcend their ability to cluster and concentrate people and economic activity. As sociologist Zachary Neal of Michigan State University argues in his new book, The Connected City, cities are made up of human social networks. Neal took time to discuss his book and research with Atlantic Cities, explaining how cities work as living organisms and why what happens in Las Vegas cannot stay in Las Vegas.

RF: In the book, you write that “communities are networks, not places.” Tell us about why and how networks matter to cities?

ZN: We often think of communities in place–based terms, like Jane Jacobs’ beloved Greenwich Village. But, whether or not a place like Greenwich Village is really a community has more to do with the residents’ relationships with one another — their social networks – than with where they happen to live or work. The danger of thinking about communities as places is that it can lead us to find communities where they don’t exist.  A neighborhood where the residents never interact is merely a place, but hardly a community. This can lead us to overlook communities that are not rooted in particular places, like a book club with a constantly changing venue.

Communities aren’t disappearing, but to find them we need to stop looking in places, and start looking in social networks.”

Image: easyshutter /Shutterstock

via massurban




(via yourhandwritingshouldbecomeafont)

the Fritz Neumeyer adressed the the impact of modernism on the traditional urban landscape. The rise of high modernism had a massive impact on the city fabric. From the fragmentation of city caused by new infrastructure, to the new building typologies that poped up in reaction to the ‘modern’. The Rory Hyde article was interesting as it adressed the role of the architect in a changing world. Like in the 1900’s we are now seeing another shift in ways of conceiving what the city is. Similarly, the Anne-Marie Slaughter article adresses the interdisciplinary intermixing that is happening today as a result of globalization.Many froms of what were traditionally conceived as ”professions” are now becoming obsolete. There is a new interest in the diversification of professions; either redefining what they are, or branching off and becoming a completely new entity . 

Both the Varnelis and leamer + Storper articles addressed telecommunications networks and the infrastructure that goes along with it. Varnelis writes About the layering that goes along with each phase of the ever evolving network infrastructure. As one form of communication became obsolete, it’s predecessor did not replace the old system of infrastructure but rather was layered on top what was existing. Both articles addressed the expansion of transportation and its relationship to the communications sector. As the the railroad expanded so did communications networks. Networks concentrate around cities becoming decentralized nodes.

fastcompany:

Feels like the future.

The Med Sensation glove, now in its second iteration, is outfitted with sensors that can detect vibrations, sound, and temperature—and it features an accelerometer and a buzzer system for items that require immediate attention. “If you apply too much pressure on the examined tissue, then the buzzer goes on,” explains team member Elishai Ezra.

The third version will come with micro-ultrasounds on the glove fingertips. All the information derived from a glove-guided examination can be wirelessly transmitted to an outside device. “The idea is to quantify touch,” says Ezra.

Your Future Robotic Hand Will Be Able To Detect Everything From Abnormal Breast Lumps To Enlarged Lymph Nodes

infographicdesign:

Global Internet Map 2011 [Infographic]

infographicdesign:

Global Internet Map 2011 [Infographic]

LOOKING INSIDE WHAT MAKES THE INTERNET TICK. personal blog